How to learn neuroscience: An introductory guide

  1. Get interested in neuroscience
  2. Read neuroscience books
  3. Read textbooks
  4. Read academic papers
  5. Enter the laboratory
  6. Go ahead…

1. Get interested in neuroscience

As you’ve arrived at this note, you should have an interest in neuroscience.
We’ll look at how to develop that interest in the following sections.

2. Read neuroscience books

The first place to start would be neuroscience books.
(Or perhaps many people get interested in neuroscience through these.)

3. Read textbooks

Once you have read the above books, it’s time to try textbooks.

4. Read academic papers

Once you’ve reached this point, it’s time to start reading the research paper.

5. Enter the laboratory

There is a big gap between “being able to read academic papers” and “actually being involved in the research”.
If you’re just reading textbooks and academic papers, you may think:
‘There are too many things to point out in this paper.’
‘Isn’t it taking too long to publish one paper?’

6. Go ahead…

After you start your research, you’d develop many interests:
‘I love this field.’
‘I want to learn this technique.’

Plus: Things you should do before you join the lab

Exposure to programming

Programming is becoming the liberal arts of today’s scientists.
I think it is advisable to become familiar with programming before you enter the laboratory that you don’t reject it. I have taken several online Python courses (ex. Coursera).

Develop information gathering skills

Information gathering skills are also very important for research.
I use the following two main information sources.

Conclusion

Thank you for reading this long article to the end.
I’d be more than happy to help even one more person aspire to pursue neuroscience!

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Daichi Konno

Daichi Konno

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M.D., Ph.D. candidate (neuroscience) at the University of Tokyo, Japan. I love the moment when learning new knowledge makes the world seem more ordered.